Available now from Bold Strokes Books, and from all your favorite retailers. In paperback and all e-book formats.
Available now from Bold Strokes Books, and from all your favorite retailers. In paperback and all e-book formats.

Some excellent news today–Fool’s Gold has received an honorable mention in the Rainbow Awards! An Honorable Mention means that the book has received a minimum of 35 out of 40 points from the judges. Winners will be announced on December 8. *flailing happy dance*

Here are what the judges had to say:

So good – an exciting page turner. Innovative in using both Victorian London and the pioneering days of America. Well drawn – interesting to have a black man in such an important role, but he was just accepted. Quite a lot of characters with in depth relationships between them which gave the book depth. This book was the third in a series, but I didn’t find it a problem. It was an exciting and fast moving plot with lots of intricacy, although there was some reliance on coincidence (acknowledged in the story). I liked the adventure taking more time than the relationship. Well written, good description, vocabulary and grammar made for an excellent read.

Taut, intriguing, companionable—three words to describe the reader experience of Fool’s Gold. In this beautifully written story, we find, as we always do, that all that sparkles is not gold. What we lose in the discovery makes Faraday’s theme of what we gain in the recovery all the more satisfying.

I read the series for context before tackling this one as it was on my tbr pile anyway. I found this final book a little less satisfying than the first two – which would have been solid 40s. Maybe the switch of the London characters to the Wild West didn’t work, because I never felt the setting fit the characters very well, while well described. However, the main character, Ira Adler, develops throughout this series from a kept boy into a strong, moral, inspirational man.  The side characters are equally as familiar and very well described and fleshed out. The plot slowed a bit midway (only a little), but it was enough to mark it down by a point. I’d happily read anything by Jess Faraday now, however, because ze can obviously write very good historical mystery fiction.

Thank you judges!

You can check out Fool’s Gold and the other Ira Adler books here, and my standalone novels here.

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